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'TDK'

Mark
Mark


BAFTA award for sound

BAFTA awarded
Best Sound, 2000
Theme Park World
Bullfrog Productions


BAFTA nominated
Best Sports Game, 2003
Formula One Career Challenge
Electronic Arts


Develop awarded
Best Use of IP, 2008
Metal Gear Solid Mobile
Konami


Develop nominated
Best Sound, 2008
Race Driver : GRID
Codemasters Software


BAFTA awarded
Best Sports Game, 2009
Race Driver: GRID
Codemasters Software


BAFTA awarded
Best Sports Game, 2011
F1 2010
Codemasters Software




Mark%20Knight


So, who is Mark Knight?

Well, for as start I've been working professionally, in sound, for the games industry since 1992 (I was 19, so I'm not 'THAT' old!). Before that, I was making music for demos on the Amiga under the handle TDK, and continue to release music under the name Mark 'TDK' Knight.

After contributing a numner of tunes for Guy Spy, my first complete job was a for the Mindscape International re-arranging the 24 channel orchestral score from Wing Commander on to the Commodore Amiga and CD32 platforms. The result was recognised as being "ahead of its time", attempting to recreated an orchestral soundtrack within the confines of the 4 channel sound chip - and a memory limit of less than 200kb. The soundtrack was also fully interactive, changing as your situation changed throught the game.

After Wing Commander, I accepted a full time position with Mindscape as their audio specialist (jack of all tracks audio bloke/monkey). During this time, I worked on many games, including Captive 2 - Liberation ("one of the best soundtracks of all time"), the classic platform game Out to Lunch, and the critically acclaimed follow up to Shadow of the Horned Rat, Warhammer, Dark Omen. I remained at Mindscape for 5 1/2 years, until the development team was shut down.

Not wanting to hang around, I then went back to freelance work and started work with my old friend, Nick Pelling (who wrote Wing Commander on the Amiga), on Duke Nukem - Total Meltdown for the Playstation. This involved remixing 11 of the PC tracks, and creating another 20 original tracks, in the space of 4 months. I took a bit of a gamble with the style of soundtrack for this one. Duke is primarily a guitar based soundtrack, but since we were aiming for a slightly more European market I decided to make the soundtrack a little less guitar, and a little more electronic. Judging by the amount of fan mail I still get for this game, the gamble worked.

Straight after Duke, I was offered a position at one of my favourite games developers - Bullfrog Productions. Initially working as a composer on titles such as Populous the Beginning, and Dungeon Keeper 2, but as Electronic Arts took control of the team I took the position of Lead Audio Designer on titles such as Quake 3 (PS2), Formula One, and Shox. As part of the EA sound team, I also won a BAFTA for Best Sound, with the game Theme Park World.

I left EA in January 2003 to work with the band Massive Attack, creating string parts and violin effect patches (now you know what the "madfiddler" references may stand for) for their live tour. I had hoped that this would lead to further work with the band but unfortunately it didn't..

Whilst freelancing for Climax, working on Sudeki in, I became more and more involved with Russell Kay's Visual Science company development company. They had worked on F1 for EA, and contacted me nearing the end of development of F1 2003. This involvement ultimately resulted in me taking a full time position with them in 2004 to build an internal audio department. Sadly, in February 2006, Visual Science became yet another UK video games development company closure statistic.

In April 2006 I was proud to get the opportunity to go back to EA, all be it at a different studio in the North West of England. So, having moved home once again being convinced by the promise of a 'job for life', was made redundant six months later as EA shut down the studio to please the shareholders.

Having decided to stay put, and not move for any cheap job offer (of which there were plenty), I decided to go freelance but with a more open view to what I did. This time, I not only offering sound design and composing services for the games industry, but to also offered services for the film, television, and education industries, whilst also offering tuition, session work, and wedding performance on the violin.

This all came to a head once I found out I was to be a Daddy, and realised I needed the "stablity" (???) of a full time job. I then accepted the fourth job offer from Codemasters Software, leading the audio team on their racing titles - which is a pretty damn good job for a petrol head like myself. So far, I'm a happy boy! :)


Website and content (c) Mark Knight
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